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Disability Studies

Open Education Resource (OER)

Disability Studies Post Graduate Students Inspire New Ways of Understanding Disability in Africa

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OER 2016 

Follow the link above to view the Division's 2016 work on open education resources focusing on matters of disability and climate change.

 

TEDI Project Infographic

 

Navigating disability issues in Africa and beyond

What is the focus of your poster?

This model promotes factors to ensure that disabled people are able can carry out economic activities that are gender-specific and locally relevant within the wider cultural-political environment. Understanding each oth er, respect and acceptance of others will create a more suitable habitat for human kind.

  • Use disability as a tool to help African society work for Africans Navigation-The route for getting to the root of it.
  • Accessibility is an issue for disabled people as they can't get to their environments of choice.
  • Unveiled- related to mystery and assumptions of disability, draw comparison with Islam.
  • Rethink what it means to be African, how Africa relates to itself and positions itself in the world.
  • Accommodate our diverse histories and their inters ections and see it as social wealth.
  • Afribility not Afrobility because AFRO is not African as it refers to First Worldness.
  • Critique UCT's drive to be Afrocentric and Afropolitan- copy the west? First world? An African who identifies with their African and European heritage and mixed culture?

Why is this focus an important issue to consider?

There are many reasons for a focus on promoting an Afrocentric perspective on disability such as intersectionality and positionality . This is because the distribution of money, power and prestige is based on axes of discrimination: social, economic, gender, ethnicity, age, education, disability, language, dialect, sexuality, religion and class.

What is the most important message/conclusion you would like to share with us?

  • Recognise that: Identity, power, privilege, positionality is relational.
  • Understand the views of mental health and wellbeing along the spectrum of: individual, carers, community, country, nation and the world.
  • Sensitivity and awareness of wisdom, beliefs and cultures.
  • Move away from disability as a negative identity.
  • Model is:

- Ageless
- Universal
- Transcultural
- Humanitarian
- Indigenous
- Socially conscious
- Disability confidence
- All humans have universal, existential conflicts
- Fear of being unaccepted- Othering (embodiment)
- Economic freedom as the route to wellbeing advocacy tool

Below is a poster on one of the unique models of Disability in an African context, developed by the Postgraduate students of the Disability Studies Program:

  1. Navigating disability issues in Africa and beyond, by Fadia Gamieldien

    CBR and Inclusive education

    What is the focus of your poster?

    I am proposing an integrated role of Community Based Workers (CBW) in education. The UN convention for people with disability has focssed people's right to an education. However, disability as a form of diversity within society has been ignored when it comes to curriculum. Instead, normality is used as a base for education. This has increased the alienation of people with disability within their own school environment.
    Community Based Rehabilitation (CBR) and CBW as social development activists need to have a role in integrating and including disability within curricular. The experience of other minority groups can guide the way they manage to include their lives, struggles and successes within the curriculum content/syllabi.

    Why is this focus an important issue to consider?

    Education establishments' outcomes seriously affect the way people view disability and disabled people. From the early stage of schooling concepts of being ‘normal' means being better. Normality means that you can walk, talk, hear and see. Deviation from this version of normal means you are less capable and worth less. As such, one always has reason to treat people who are not ‘normal' with pity.
    CBR as a dynamic system can act as a vehicle to facilitate change in education by focussing on disability.

    What is the most important message/conclusion you would like to share with us?

    Access to school might be harmful to people with disability if we keep our view of them as people who are lacking. . Equity in education implies an equity of concepts. Ideas we share with about who they are. Currently, educational content positions people with disabilities as different and ‘lacking' . Its these viewpoints that we provide people with disabiltieis. This will lead to more marginalisation not to inclusion.

    Below is a poster on one of the unique models of Disability in an African context, developed by the Postgraduate students of the Disability Studies Program:

  2. CBR and inclusive education, by Meqdad Mahmoud

    Togetherness; An African Disability Model

    What is the focus of your poster?

    This poster focuses on the importance of interdependence and unity among disabled people. It also focuses on the importance of creativity and use of available resources among disabled people.

    Why is this focus an important issue to consider?​​​

    • "Together we stand and divided we fall".
    • For a long time, disabled people are amongst the poorest in the world. In many parts of Africa disabled people have mainly depended on alms, donations and benevolence. Their situation has never improved but has worsened. Hence, interdependence (rather than independence) becomes an important focus in order to conquer dependence Creativity and sustainability are important pillars of poverty eradication.
    • There is power when people come together for a common purpose or are united by a common denominator.

    What is the most important message/conclusion you would like to share with us?

    There is hope at the end of the tunnel. If disabled people are ready to embrace unity, interdependence and forge for sustainable development based on available resources and on the spirit of "us for us".

    Below is a poster on one of the unique models of Disability in an African context, developed by the Postgraduate students of the Disability Studies Program:

  3. Togetherness; an African disability model, by Patrice Malonza

    UHURU (Freedom/Libration) - Let us liberate our minds. Let us be one.

    What is the focus of your poster?

    My focus is on the need for people to liberate their minds and to recognize the need for people to develop and change the way they think, perceive or make assumptions about disability and disabled people.

    Why is this focus an important issue to consider?

    Disabled people are at the heart of the African model of disability. Disabled people are a part of families, communities and societies at large. There is a connection, between the self and the collective.
    Equality, as a project of accommodating, has been understood in terms of race, gender and disability. However, it is yet to change or transform the way people think. Factors like being ‘interchangeable' and ‘interdependent' influence society and the development of disabled peoples' fight to be incorporated and accepted in civil society.

    What is the most important message/conclusion you would like to share with us?

    There is a strong connection between the individual (self) and the community (collective). I advocate for a change in the way people, society and governments perceive disability. A revival of the collective consciousness makes way for a sense of belonging. Such revival also welcomes the interconnectedness that communities have to offer to each other. Change is taking place, but it remains our collective responsibility to ensure that policies are implemented to improve the lives and perceptions of disabled people. The goal is the integration of people with disabilities into the fabric of our society as equal partners.

    Human rights shift the focus from disability alone. It locates notions of disability in the wider social context of diversity. Strategies, such as the revival of a collective consciousness and collective action will ensure implementation of this shift of disability as diversity.

    Below is a poster on one of the unique models of Disability in an African context, developed by the Postgraduate students of the Disability Studies Program:

  4. UHURU (Freedom/Libration) - Let us liberate our minds. Let us be one, by Fatima Essop

These posters present disability in new ways that should generate further debate and discourse to broaden their perspective.